Recent comments

john quinn on Inspiring Story of Brazilian Footballer Gilberto Silva (Saturday 22nd July 2017 8:24pm)

GILBERTO SILVA IS A FANTASTIC ROLE MODEL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE...HIS LIFE AND EXPERIENCES SHOULD BE HIGHLIGHTED MORE...TO THIS DAY HE IS STILL A MAN WITH A MESSAGE ..HUMILITY.... TO WORK HARD BUT WITH HUMILITY..

Gillian Cameron on A Christian academic booklist (Tuesday 18th July 2017 11:09am)

Thanks for helpful list. Any reason why D.F.M.Strauss's 'Philosophy as The Discipline of The Disciplines' failed to make the list?

David Hanson on Are we called to be academics? (Saturday 1st July 2017 5:20pm)

Hi, Alicia.
Helpful / unhelpful?
If Scripture's intent is redemptive, we should expect its systemic interest in calling to be the summons to repentance, holiness and salvation. For OT (aimed at God's covenant people, Israel) and NT (aimed now globally, also to those who were once strangers to His covenant) the aim of repentance is "redemption", "restitution", "regeneration", "restoration", "reconciliation", "renewal": - the re-establishment of right relationships with our Creator, neighbours and planet.

Rudi on Are we called to be academics? (Monday 26th June 2017 9:42pm)

I think you're hitting on a very important point. We need to stop worrying about whether the job or situation we are now in is our actual "calling". While we must all face life choices, we should be wary, I think, of believing that it is of utmost importance to God whether I stay here, or move abroad. Whether I take this job or that, etc. The more important decision is to answer the call to repentance, salvation and holiness in whatever situation we're in.

Eline van Asperen on Richard Middleton on the royal human task (Wednesday 24th May 2017 9:38am)

Thanks Alicia! Yes, the construction metaphor is quite a helpful one. And it links nicely with the New Testament metaphor of people as living stones as well.

Alicia Smith on Richard Middleton on the royal human task (Monday 22nd May 2017 11:50am)

Thanks for this Eline! We enjoyed Richard's talk when he gave it at the Graduate Christian Forum here in Oxford. I love the idea of creation as a building, and of our creative (/academic) work as a smaller kind of construction - it seems to me that using this as a major metaphor helps us keep an appropriate scholarly humility by seeing the work as a public, useful edifice which others can contribute to, rather than an expression of personal genius. 

Cal Bailey on 'Descent into Hell' and the value of academic work (Friday 19th May 2017 10:04am)

Williams is one of the most insightful authors I've read, and your illustration shows why. I think I meet people in business for whom the same is true as for Wentworth or Moffat: for some, cooperation just isn't on the agenda at all, and they operate in an isolated tower of their own purposes. if such people have power, they are particularly dangerous - some even seem to get elected to high office!

David Parry on Christian imposters? (Tuesday 4th April 2017 10:07am)

I liked this in the acknowledgements to Paul Lim's book on Richard Baxter (revised from his Cambridge PhD thesis): “Lastly my wife and trusted friend, Mikyung Kim, often reminded me of the great reality that my ultimate significance before the One was by grace, not by grade.”

Roy Clouser on God's workers? (Tuesday 28th March 2017 5:16pm)

(transmitted via David Hanson)

Alicia Smith on Christian imposters? (Monday 27th March 2017 12:06pm)

Thank you for this, Mark. It's certainly a feeling I've been dealing with in my first year of doctoral study, and it's made especially hard by the amount of fatalism around about the prospects of a successful academic career! I love the MacDonald phrase 'not driven but called': what freedom there can be in not constantly looking over our shoulders and panicking about the expectations we fear we can't meet, but instead looking ahead to the Goal of our faith, who has already accepted us.