Posts by Faith-in-Scholarship

An African Wild dog in Hluhluwe Park, South Africa (Photo Tim Kuiper)

This post is by Dr Timothy Kuiper, a postdoc in Zoology at the University of Oxford who studies elephant conservation in Zimbabwe.

I am a natural doubter - in my faith and in my work. Sometimes it’s healthy skepticism, at other times I think it becomes a kind of cynicism in which I’m afraid to trust things that I don’t understand perfectly. I’m beginning to learn what philosophers have known for centuries: the search for perfect certainty is a fool’s errand. God has been kind to me in my doubts, opening my eyes again and again to evidence that he is there, and that he cares.

protest march

Mike Wagenman takes a timely look at the power of big tech in the context of public theology.

I’m honoured to introduce myself in this forum and suggest a way that Christian faith and the public academic vocation can fit together.  My research takes place within the (Dutch) Reformed theological and philosophical tradition renewed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by Abraham Kuyper (1837-1920).  I am specifically interested in forms of institutional power within society.  I teach courses in theology (of society/culture), philosophy (of power), and (New Testament) biblical interpretation in Canada after having completed my PhD at the University of Bristol.

Liza Lansang Espinoza shares her reading of The Secularization of Science by Herman Dooyeweerd, which will be the focus of the first All of Life Redeemed webinars on 4 and 11 June.  (See this post for the flyer, including the email address for signing up.)

Dooyeweerd begins by stating his belief that religion (true or apostate) is the centre of human existence and influences all aspects of life. In modern, differentiated society, however, religion is separated from science and this results in the disintegration of society if there is no total integration of life through religion once again.

On 4 and 11 June, Richard will be delivering a 2-part webinar series as part of the All of Life Redeemed initiative.  Bruce Wearne gives a personal reflection on the article addressed by this webinar.

sea-life with converted fish

In this group post, we reflect on how Christian postgraduates and academics can share the good news of Jesus Christ's lordship.

A Speaker Training Day for Forming a Christian Mind: Cambridge, 25 May 2019

Today we're promoting a special "Forming a Christian Mind" event coming up in Cambridge on 25 May, with a booking deadline this week.  Meredith Thompson, from the FACM committee, explains...

"Pointing to Christ Through your Discipline" is a morning event that aims to help us establish vision for introducing Christianity by means of our academic specialisms.  We will conceptualise and develop material in which the questions of our academic disciplines can point explicitly to Christianity and the hope we have in Jesus Christ.

Catalysing Postgraduate Ministry: group photo

On 15-17 March 2019, about ten invited delegations of academics, postgrads and postgraduate ministry leaders gathered in New College, Oxford for the first Catalysing Postgraduate Ministry conference organised by the Oxford Pastorate as a spin-off of the Developing a Christian Mind conference. Both conferences took place in parallel, which fuelled exchange between the groups. Some CPM-participants joined one of the DCM tracks prior to the start of the CPM programme, both groups together filled New College's dining hall on Friday for formal dinner and we met in the college chapel for Saturday morning worship.

Will Allchorn's work in political science leads him to encourage Christians to subvert the radical right by radical inclusion. 

It's not too late to book for this coming Saturday's Forming a Christian Mind day conference in Cambridge. The organising team explain what's special about this event, and why you should come.

Bush of knowledge diagram: from religious roots via paradigms to observations

This guest post by Richard Russell, with input from Arthur Jones, looks at the way scientific knowledge grows out of philosophical and ultimately religious roots. 

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